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The impact of the sanctuary

Our actions have a genuine impact on animals & nature in Laos

Our real impact & outreach

The impact and outreach of the sanctuary for Laotian wildlife and nature

Our actions have a real impact on the world, on nature and on people. Here at the sanctuary, all our time, energy and skills are allocated to concrete actions for animals and nature.

Our fight inspires, influences, encourages, upsets, impresses! We think big. We are fearless. We stand up and stand for all suffering animals. Our satisfaction: Seeing our residents and animal friends blossom at the sanctuary, happy in their environment or seeing them regain their freedom in a protected park after long weeks of care. To those who say that our fight is just a drop in the ocean, we answer:

Our sanctuary is just a drop in the ocean, but what is the ocean other than a multitude of drops?

Our fight
inspires influences encourages upsets impresses
We think big. We are fearless. We stand up and stand for all suffering animals.

Concrete and
ambitious actions

Concrete and ambitious
actions

Our numerous actions are concrete and have a real impact on the world

Learn more about the missions of Animal Sanctuary Laos

A new habitat for animals

Helping animals live a dignified and happy life within the sanctuary. Discover examples of rescued animals who now live a peaceful life at the sanctuary, in idyllic conditions, surrounded by animal and human friends.

Bouba

Bouba, the sanctuary mascot

Found on the black markets in the Laotian countryside, Bouba was still a baby when she arrived at the sanctuary. She is now the project’s mascot, and she gave us the strength and inspiration to lead such a struggle for the animals. Bouba is now 7 years old and weighs about 200kg. She lives in a huge park in the heart of nature with a pool, trees, platforms, and games. Insatiable, she ingurgitates around 5 kg of food a day. She is now totally fulfilled and shares her park with a new friend named “Balou”.

Balou

A new life for Balou

Just like Bouba, Balou comes from a vile black market where protected animals are sold illegally. We found him in a small cage with a leg injury and in an alarming physical and emotional state. Balou was very difficult to heal as his trauma had ingrained in him a visceral fear of humans. With patience and tenderness, we nursed him for 3 months before being able to release him in his new park. After a few months, he was able to join Bouba. They now live together and play daily to the delight of our mascot Bouba.

Lepoard

The mysterious Leopard Cats

The stunning leopard cats living at Animal Sanctuary Laos also have a sad story. They were imprisoned in a tiny cage, mistreated, and used to produce litters of leopard kittens to be sold at a premium by traffickers. Since their arrival at the sanctuary, this male and female live a peaceful life, resting in hollow trees or in holes they create and have remained very wild. Mostly nocturnal and solitary, they can be seen at dusk, and we can say that they do not really disturb the other residents.

Leopard cats
Civet

The story of the adopted civet

The story of our civet cat friend is worthy of the greatest tragedies. One day, a local brought us a tiny animal, a baby, with its eyes still closed. He was incredibly cute, but there was a problem! The hunters had decimated his family, so how were we going to feed him? Who was going to breastfeed him? 

The large Indian civet is a mammal originating from South and Southeast Asia. Formerly called musk cat, this animal of the viverridae family resembles a cat but is larger and taller.

The story of our civet cat friend is worthy of the greatest tragedies. One day, a local brought us a tiny animal, a baby, with its eyes still closed. He was incredibly cute, but there was a problem! The hunters had decimated his family, so how were we going to feed him? Who was going to breastfeed him? By chance, a cat from the sanctuary had just given birth to a litter of kittens. Just like Mowgli in the Jungle Book, our civet was adopted, not by monkeys but by this cat who shared her milk and love with this newborn of another species. Very happy with his environment and his new companions, this little male quickly became a playful, curious, and affectionate little creature.

This magnificent civet now lives in his park, loved, cherished, and protected from predators and poachers. She weighs 10kg, eats like four and regularly visits her leopard cat neighbors.

The civet is an extraordinary animal! Did you know that the secretions of the civet’s anal glands were used in pharmacy and in the manufacture of cigars and perfumes? They gave off a musky scent. Their use goes as far back as 2,000 years ago; they had the reputation of being very appreciated by Cleopatra.

Large Indian Civet

Giving freedom back to abused animals

In some cases, the sanctuary’s residents are only taken in until they are released into the wild. Nothing brings us more joy than to give an animal its freedom back. Below are examples of animals we have rescued, nursed and successfully rehabilitated.

Loris

What could be cuter than a Loris?

Lorises are adorable animals that would make any hardened heart break! They have soft gray or brown fur and can be recognized by their huge eyes surrounded by dark spots. Lorises are arboreal and nocturnal, curling up to sleep during the day. Locals know they are safe at the sanctuary, so we often get poor injured Lorises, often orphaned.  We take care of them and release them in the Laos elephant reserve or in the protected mountains surrounding the sanctuary. Lorises are often hunted for their meat, used in traditional medicine or for the pet trade.

Eagle

The majestic Eagle Owl

Another poor animal that was lucky enough to come across the Animal Sanctuary Laos team. This Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo) was found in a local market by Christophe’s wife. It was tied up and in a near death condition. This poor owl was destined to end up in a pot, for the consumption of its meat.

Another poor animal that was lucky enough to come across the Animal Sanctuary Laos team. This Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo) was found in a local market by Christophe’s wife. It was tied up and in a near death condition. This poor owl was destined to end up in a pot, for the consumption of its meat.

The Eagle Owl is a bird of prey of incredible beauty, its silhouette is massive, its head, pricked with two big red-orange eyes is surmounted by egrets.  It is sometimes considered the largest owl in the world (females can reach a total length of 75 cm, with a wingspan of 188 cm, males being slightly smaller). In flight, it is easily recognizable by its large wingspan, with its long, broad wings and pointed head.

After 3 months of care at the sanctuary, we had the pleasure to give him back his freedom and to see him fly away in the reserve, protected by our partners.

Iguanas

Iguanas deserve our love

At the Sanctuary, reptiles are also rescued and protected. Here, in Asia, it is not uncommon to find large iguanas in captivity, as pets. This is the case of some iguanas that we find in alarming states, locked in tiny cages, malnourished and often close to death. We take care of them at the sanctuary and then release them in selected areas of the surrounding Laotian mountains.

At the Sanctuary, reptiles are also rescued and protected. Here, in Asia, it is not uncommon to find large iguanas in captivity, as pets. This is the case of some iguanas that we find in alarming states, locked in tiny cages, malnourished and often close to death. We take care of them at the sanctuary and then release them in selected areas of the surrounding Laotian mountains.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), iguanas are among the most endangered animals in the world. In the wild, iguana numbers are declining dramatically due to habitat loss and predators.

Often overlooked is the fact that some iguanas can live 20 years or more and can grow up to six feet from nose to tail. Like many other reptiles, iguanas need UV light to make vitamin D in their skin, which then allows them to absorb calcium from their food. They are fascinating lizards – did you know for example that green iguanas are very resilient? They can fall from a 12-meter-high branch, hit the ground, and survive, according to National Geographic.

Iguana on a tree
Monkey

An island for abused monkeys

The story of Monkey Island is incredibly touching. Here in Laos, some monasteries rescue animals that locals want to get rid of. One often finds many cats and dogs around the monasteries, sometimes goats, or all kinds of other animals. This is the case of a monastery in the region of Animal Sanctuary Laos, which was taking care of monkeys but where the monks, due to lack of time, money, and structures, were keeping the monkeys tied up. 

The story of Monkey Island is incredibly touching. Here in Laos, some monasteries rescue animals that locals want to get rid of. One often finds many cats and dogs around the monasteries, sometimes goats, or all kinds of other animals. This is the case of a monastery in the region of Animal Sanctuary Laos, which was taking care of monkeys but where the monks, due to lack of time, money, and structures, were keeping the monkeys tied up. Knowing Christophe for his reputation of integrity and seeing that the sanctuary is a place where animals are treated with love, the monks decided to give the macaques to Animal Sanctuary Laos.

Christophe then decided to dedicate an entire island on Nam Ngum Lake so that the monkeys could have a beautiful place to live, protected from human threats. Years after their reintroduction, they live and feed independently in their natural environment. Human presence is not allowed on this island, but it is possible to see them by boat.

Monkeys on a tree

It’s only the beginning…

Do you appreciate our struggle? Are you inspired by our team? Do you believe that our actions have a real impact? The success stories described above are only examples of actions carried out with passion and determination… There are many others. Find out more about our actions and keep up to date with the latest news about animals on our blog.

Discover more

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